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Maternal adversity and cardiovascular health of the offspring

conference contribution
posted on 2021-09-01, 00:00 authored by Natalie HydeNatalie Hyde, Anna Scovelle, James Dowty, Lisa OliveLisa Olive, Adrienne O'NeilAdrienne O'Neil
Abstract Background We investigated the respective and cumulative impact of mothers’ exposure(s) to adversity over time on cardiovascular (CV) outcomes of her offspring. Methods Participants were part of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Offspring CV measures were collected at seven and 17 years of age. Maternal adversity was self-reported from the onset of pregnancy to 8-weeks postnatal. Linear mixed models were used to analyse associations between adversity and log-transformed longitudinal CV outcomes. Results There was no association between cumulative or perceived impact of maternal adversity with CV outcomes in either sex. Specific adversities were associated with CV outcomes. For example, at age seven in girls, “Argued with partner” (β:0.9764 95%CI:0.9608-0.9922) was associated with decreased heart rate, and at age 17 “Partner rejected pregnancy” (β:1.0716 95% CI:1.0191-1.1269) with increased heart rate. In boys, at age seven “Partner was ill” (β:0.9713 95%CI:0.9511-0.9920) was associated with decreased systolic blood pressure, and at age 17 “Very ill” (β:1.0323 95%CI:1.0091-1.0561) with increased systolic blood pressure. Conclusions There were no associations evident with the primary exposure measure of maternal adversity and offspring CV outcomes. Specific adversities were associated with favourable changes in offspring CV outcomes at age seven, however the association reversed at age 17. This could be due to a protective adaptive response to maternal adversity present in childhood that may reverse trajectory by age 17. Key messages There was no association between cumulative maternal adversity and offspring cardiovascular outcomes, however specific events may be associated with cardiovascular outcomes in an age-dependent manner.

History

Volume

50

Pagination

107-107

ISSN

0300-5771

eISSN

1464-3685

Language

English

Publication classification

E3 Extract of paper

Title of proceedings

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY

Issue

Supplement_1

Publisher

OXFORD UNIV PRESS

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