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Re-thinking Middle Eastern democracy : lessons from ancient Mesopotamia

conference contribution
posted on 01.01.2006, 00:00 authored by Benjamin IsakhanBenjamin Isakhan
The issue of Middle Eastern democracy has long inspired lively academic debate and research from across the ideological and political spectrum. Despite their differences, much of this work measures the successes and failures of Middle Eastern democracy against the Western model, with its antecedents in the political machinations found in Athens during the 5th century B.C. However, there is growing evidence to suggest that the history of democracy began on the other side of the Occidental/Oriental line and can be traced as far back as the early Mesopotamian myths of Enuma Elish, through to the grand empires of the Babylonians, Assyrians, Egyptians and Phoenicians. In the interest of fostering a liberal, democratic and egalitarian Middle East, this paper concludes by suggesting that one strategy for re-thinking the Middle East’s democratisation is to engage the powerful discourses of the Middle East’s ancient, and democratic, past.

History

Event

Australasian Political Studies Association. Conference (2006 : Newcastle, New South Wales)

Pagination

1 - 16

Publisher

APSA

Location

Newcastle, New South Wales

Place of publication

[Newcastle, N.S.W.]

Start date

25/09/2006

End date

27/09/2006

Language

eng

Publication classification

E1.1 Full written paper - refereed

Copyright notice

2006, APSA

Title of proceedings

APSA 2006 : Proceedings of the 2006 Australasian Political Studies Association conference

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