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Social inclusion, social movements, and the characteristics of late modernity

conference contribution
posted on 2003-01-01, 00:00 authored by Shaun Cannon
In discussing the ideology of social inclusion, this paper demonstrates that the composition of community groups in a period of late modernity is worthy of consideration. Although it would appear, on the surface at least, that previously stable community institutions, such as family, organised religion, trade unions, occupation and residential stability, and so on, are being challenged by a broad rejection of the once powerful tool of tradition, society's attachment to a belief in the symbolic value of community remains strong. In an environment however, in which the interaction and interdependence of human activity is subject to continual re-evaluation as the current processes of industrialisation and globalisation unfold, the template of what constitutes 'community' may need to be re-defined. It is to this end that the present paper is concerned, in that it seeks to identify new community formations. Of particular interest, is the rise and reach of modern day 'social movements', and why, when analysing the subject from a macro-sociological perspective, they have come to assume such a pivotal role in occupying community spaces left vacant by the demise of traditional social institutions. The paper is exploratory in its focus, using relevant literature to posit some broad theoretical themes, with the aim of presenting such themes to encourage a shift in community debates away from traditional concerns about 'who' and 'how many', towards questions of why new community forms are emerging.

History

Event

Australian Social Policy Conference (2003 : Sydney, N.S.W.)

Pagination

1 - 16

Publisher

University of New South Wales

Location

Sydney, N.S.W.

Place of publication

Sydney, N.S.W.

Start date

2003-07-09

End date

2003-07-11

Language

eng

Publication classification

E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed

Title of proceedings

ASPC 2003 : Australian Social Policy Conference Program & Abstracts

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