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Splitting centre : directing attention in trans-media dance performance

conference contribution
posted on 2015-01-01, 00:00 authored by Jordan Vincent, Kim Vincs, John Mccormick
In theatrical vernacular, the term ‘splitting centre’ refers to two performers staged at an equal distance from a centre point and sharing the focus of the audience. This term encapsulates the notion that two people (or, in the case of trans-media dance, two or more performance entities) are dividing the attention of the audience, operating as equal collaborators in a performance context. The augmentation of live performance with 3D
projected scenography and mobile devices offers a starting point for discussions on the potential for dramaturgy, choreographic process, and changing expectations for audience behaviour in the theatre. In 2014, Deakin Motion.Lab premiered The Crack Up, a trans-media dance work that incorporated live performance, 3D digital scenography, and The Crack Up App, an app for mobile devices that audience members were invited to interact with during the performance. This investigation into the potential of trans-media dance performance, (defined here as a live
performance in which both the digital and biological elements are choreographed as artistic equals within the theatrical context) with the addition of a mobile device raises questions about how the makers of trans-media dance might direct the attention of their audiences when the work is performed simultaneously across multiple platforms.

History

Event

International Symposium on Electronic Art (21st : 2015 : Vancouver, British Columbia)

Pagination

1 - 1

Publisher

[The Conference]

Location

Vancouver, British Columbia

Place of publication

[Vancouver, B.C.]

Start date

2015-04-14

End date

2015-04-18

ISBN-13

9781910172001

Publication classification

E1 Full written paper - refereed

Copyright notice

2015, The Conference

Title of proceedings

ISEA 2015 : Proceedings of the 21st International Symposium on Electronic Art

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