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THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN OBESITY AND THE INCIDENCE OF PRIMARY SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY: AN AOANJRR STUDY

conference contribution
posted on 2023-03-06, 03:25 authored by Richard PageRichard Page, SDJ Morgan, CJ Wall, Richard N de Steiger, SE Graves, MF Lorrimer
The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of obesity in patients undergoing primary total shoulder replacement (TSR) (stemmed and reverse) for osteoarthritis (OA) in Australia compared to the incidence of obesity in the general population. A 2017-18 cohort of 2,621 patients from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR) who underwent TSR, were compared with matched controls from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) National Health Survey from the same period. The two groups were analysed according to BMI category, sex and age. According to the 2017-18 National Health Survey, 35.6% of Australian adults are overweight and 31.3% are obese. Of the primary TSR cases performed, 34.2% were overweight and 28.6% were obese. The relative risk of requiring TSR for OA increased with increasing BMI category. Class-3 obese females, aged 55-64, were 8.9 times more likely to require TSR compared to normal weight counterparts. Males in the same age and BMI category were 2.5 times more likely. Class-3 obese patients underwent TSR 4 years (female) and 7 years (male) sooner than their normal weight counterparts. Our findings suggest that the obese population is at risk for early and more frequent TSR for OA. Previous studies demonstrate that obese patients undergoing TSR also exhibit increased risks of longer operative times, higher superficial infection rates, higher periprosthetic fracture rates, significantly reduced post-operative forward flexion range and greater revision rates. Obesity significantly increases the risk of requiring TSR. To our knowledge this is the first study to publish data pertaining to age and BMI stratification of TSR Societal efforts are vital to diminish the prevalence and burden of obesity related TSR. There may well be reversible pathophysiology in the obese population to address prior to surgery (adipokines, leptin, NMDA receptor upregulation). Surgery occurs due to recalcitrant or increased pain despite non-op Mx.

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Alternative title

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN OBESITY AND THE INCIDENCE OF PRIMARY SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY: AN AOANJRR STUDY

Pagination

69-69

Location

Christchurch, New Zealand

Start date

2022-10-31

End date

2022-11-03

Title of proceedings

Orthopaedic Proceedings

Event

The New Zealand Orthopaedic Association and the Australian Orthopaedic Association (NZOA AOA) Combined Annual Scientific Meeting

Publisher

Bone&Joint

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