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The State, Civil Society and Neoliberalism since the Korean Economic Crisis

conference contribution
posted on 2014-07-11, 00:00 authored by David HundtDavid Hundt
By analysing the power of the Korean state vis-à-vis civil society since the economic crisis of the late 1990s, this article tests the assumption that neo-liberalism inevitably detracts from state strength. The state has retained its influential position as economic manager. Rather than being a disempowering force, neo-liberal reform was a means by which the Korean state enhanced its position in respect to civil society. The state presented itself as an agent capable of resolving long-standing economic problems, and of defending law and order. We conclude that for some states, neo-liberalism is an opportunity to remain a weighty economic actor, and former developmental states may be particularly adept at co-opting elements of civil society into governing alliances.

History

Pagination

1-14

Location

Melbourne, Vic.

Start date

2014-07-09

End date

2014-07-11

Publication classification

E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed

Editor/Contributor(s)

[Unknown]

Title of proceedings

OCIS 2014 : Proceedings of the 6th Oceanic Conference on International Studies

Event

Oceanic Conference on International Studies. Conference (6th : 2014 : Melbourne, Vic.)

Publisher

OCIS

Place of publication

[Melbourne, Vic.]