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The impact of adverse and positive experiences on inflammatory outcomes in Australian and UK children

conference contribution
posted on 2021-09-01, 00:00 authored by Shuaijun Guo, Dawid Gondek, Meredith O'Connor, Stephanie Cahill, Marnie Downes, Margarita Moreno-Betancur, David Burgner, Natalie Slopen, Sharon Goldfeld, Melissa Wake, Markus Juonala, Jessica Kerr, Kate LycettKate Lycett, Yichao WangYichao Wang, Rebecca Lacey, Naomi Priest
Abstract

Background
Inflammation is one of key mechanisms linking childhood experiences to later chronic disease risk. Childhood adversity is associated with inflammation, but little is known about positive experiences. We examine how adverse and positive experiences are associated with inflammatory markers in late childhood, and whether they have an interaction effect.


Methods
Data sources: Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC; N = 1237) and Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC; N = 3488). Exposures: Adverse and positive experiences assessed from 0 to 11 (LSAC) and 0-14 years (ALSPAC). Adversity indicators included parent legal problems, family violence, mental illness, substance abuse, harsh parenting, parental divorce, neighbourhood violence, family member death, and bullying victimization. Positive experiences included positive parenting practice, trusting and supportive relationships, supportive neighbourhood and home learning environments, social engagement and enjoyment. Outcomes: Inflammation quantified by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and glycoprotein acetyls (GlycA). Analyses: Linear regression was used to estimate relative change in inflammatory markers, adjusted for sociodemographics. Outcomes were log-transformed.


Results
Exposure to adversity was associated with higher levels of inflammation (e.g., CRP: β = 8.8%, 95% CI= -16.5% to 34.2% in LSAC), whereas exposure to positive experiences was associated with lower levels (e.g., CRP: β=-18.9%, 95% CI= -45.8% to 7.9% in LSAC), after adjusting for sociodemographics. There was no interaction effect of adverse and positive experiences on inflammation.


Conclusions
Adverse and positive experiences have independent and small effects on children’s inflammation across two cohorts.


Key messages
Positive experiences are critical to inform interventions to improve inflammatory outcomes for children who face adversity.

History

Volume

50

Issue

Supplement_1

Pagination

88 - 88

Publisher

OXFORD UNIV PRESS

ISSN

0300-5771

eISSN

1464-3685

Language

English

Publication classification

E3 Extract of paper

Title of proceedings

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY

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