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RGB Wattle Park chalet

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posted on 2013-01-01, 00:00 authored by Simon GrennanSimon Grennan
New technologies have arguably displaced the hegemony of painting within the hierarchies of contemporary art. Projectors and other digital imaging technologies in particular continue to expand the contemporary artist’s aesthetic and conceptual possibilities beyond canvas, paper, and stone. Yet painting - the practice of smearing coloured mud about - far from being superseded, simply continues to cannibalise these powerful technologies extruding them into its own analogue processes. Whether intentionally or as an by-product of this cannibalisation, painting tends to create a critical distance in which the tacit aspects of these technologies – their representational language and ‘special effects’ - are made fully visible. Of course 'easel' painting practices persist not only to critique new technologies. Rather new technologies inevitably fold back into the now souped-up vocabularies of contemporary painting, expanding the medium’s physical boundaries, formal strategies, and modes of display.

History

Publisher

Denny Lascelles Gallery, Projections/WCCA 2013 Exhibition and Conference. April, 2013

Place of publication

Geelong, Vic.

Creation date

2013-01-01

Material type

art original

Language

eng

Notes

Corner Piece. Displayed as part of a curated international group exhibition 'Projections 2013' associated with the World Congress on Communication and Arts held at the Geelong Waterfront Campus.

Publication classification

J2 Minor original creative work; JO4 Original creative work - Other

Extent

I painting; acrylic directly on exhibition wall: Aprox 700mm X 900mm

Editor/Contributor(s)

C Bishop

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