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A pilot intervention to reduce postpartum weight retention and central adiposity in first-time mothers: results from the mums OnLiNE (Online, Lifestyle, Nutrition & Exercise) study

BACKGROUND: Postpartum weight retention (PPWR) increases the risk for obesity and complications during subsequent pregnancies. Few interventions have been successful in limiting PPWR in mothers. The present study assessed the effectiveness of the mums OnLiNE (Online, Lifestyle, Nutrition & Exercise) intervention with respect to reducing PPWR and improving diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviour. METHODS: A subsample of first-time mothers enrolled in the Extended Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT Extend) completed the nonrandomised mums OnLiNE intervention. Women in the intervention (I) group (n = 28) received access to an online calorie tracking program, smartphone app, three telephone counselling calls with a dietitian and written material. Women in two comparison groups (CI and C2) (n = 48; n = 43) were from the control (C1) and intervention (C2) arms of InFANT Extend and received no additional support. Weight and waist circumference were measured objectively. Written surveys assessed diet and physical activity. Sedentary behaviour was self-reported. Linear and logistic regression assessed changes in outcomes between groups from 9 to 18 months postpartum. RESULTS: Mean PPWR decreased in the (I) group (-1.2 kg) and the C2 group (-1.2 kg), although the changes were not significant. Mean waist circumference for all groups exceeded recommendations at baseline but decreased to below recommendations for women in the (I) group (78.3 cm) and significantly for the (I) group (-6.4 cm) compared to C1 (-1.1 cm; P = 0.002) and C2 (-3.3 cm; P = 0.001). Changes in diet, physical activity or sedentary behaviour were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: The online intervention reported in the present study shows promise with respect to reducing waist circumference in postpartum women. Further evidence of strategies that may improve weight and related behaviours in this target group is needed.

History

Journal

Journal of human nutrition & dietetics

Volume

31

Issue

3

Pagination

314 - 328

Publisher

Wiley

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

0952-3871

eISSN

1365-277X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal; C Journal article

Copyright notice

2017, The British Dietetic Association