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A problem of proportions: estimates of metabolic associated fatty liver disease and liver fibrosis in Australian adults in the nationwide 2012 AusDiab Study

journal contribution
posted on 2023-02-22, 04:15 authored by A M Farrell, D J Magliano, Jonathan Shaw, A J Thompson, C Croagh, M C Ryan, J Howell
Metabolic Associated Fatty Liver Disease (MAFLD) is the most common cause of liver disease in Australia, but prevalence data are limited. We aimed to describe the frequency of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation, and MAFLD within a large prospective Australian cohort. Cross-sectional analysis of the 2012 survey of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study which included 4747 Australian adults (aged 34–97 yrs) was performed. Frequency of ALT elevation (men ≥ 40 IU/L, women ≥ 30 IU/L) and MAFLD (Fatty Liver Index (FLI) > 60 alongside metabolic risk factors) was determined and risk of advanced fibrosis stratified using the BARD score. Elevated ALT was found in 13% of the cohort, including 22% of people with diabetes, 18% with obesity, and 17% with the metabolic syndrome. 37% of the cohort had MAFLD, and those with MAFLD were more likely to be older (OR 1.01 per 1 year (95% CI 1.00–1.02)), male (OR 1.37 (95% CI 1.17–1.59)), have ALT elevation (OR 3.21 (95% CI 2.59–3.99)), diabetes (OR 3.39 (95% CI 2.61–4.39)), lower HDL-C (OR 0.15 per 1 mmol/L (95% CI 0.12–0.19)), higher diastolic blood pressure (OR 1.05 per 10 mmHg (95% CI 1.05–1.06)), a sedentary lifestyle (OR 1.99 (95% CI 1.59–2.50)) and less likely to have tertiary education (OR 0.81 (95% CI 0.7–0.94) compared to those without MAFLD. Of those with MAFLD, 61% had a BARD score suggesting risk of advanced fibrosis and 22% had an elevated ALT. Over 10% of this Australian cohort had elevated ALT, and 37% had MAFLD, with many at risk for advanced fibrosis.

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Journal

Scientific Reports

Volume

12

eISSN

2045-2322

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