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Abusive interactions and burnout: examining occupation, gender, and the mediating role of community

journal contribution
posted on 2001-01-01, 00:00 authored by Michael LeiterMichael Leiter, C Frizzell, P Harvie, L Churchill
Two studies examined the association of gender and occupational group (nursing versus non-nursing) with perceived risk of abuse (sexual harassment and verbal and physical abuse) as well as the relationship of perceived abuse risk with burnout and sense of community. Study 1, comprising of two settings (tertiary care hospital, N = 3,062; psychiatric hospital, N = 383), found gender and occupational group associated with perceived risk of abuse (women felt greater risk than men; nurses felt greater risk than non-nurses). It also found a gender/occupational group interaction. Study 2, conducted at an Irish tertiary care hospital (N = 892), found nurses felt at greater risk for all three types of abuse than did non-nurses. Further, women perceived themselves at greater risk for sexual harassment and verbal abuse than did men; the study found no gender difference regarding physical abuse. The analysis identified a gender/occupational group interaction for sexual harassment. The study considers methods of reducing perceived risk in regard to the research literature on abuse at work.

History

Journal

Psychology and health

Volume

16

Issue

5

Pagination

547 - 563

Publisher

Taylor & Francis Group

Location

Abingdon, Eng.

ISSN

0887-0446

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2001, Overseas Publishers Association N.V.