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Adrenergic innervation of the large arteries and veins of the semiarboreal rat snake Elaphe obsoleta

Version 2 2024-06-03, 11:44
Version 1 2017-04-28, 14:40
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 11:44 authored by John DonaldJohn Donald, HB Lillywhite
Fluorescence histochemistry was used to study the adrenergic innervation of the large arteries and veins at six points along the body of the semiarboreal rat snake Elaphe obsoleta. Apart from the vessels adjacent to the heart, there was a marked contrast in the density of adrenergic innervation of anterior and posterior systemic arteries and veins. The anterior arteries and veins have little adrenergic innervation in contrast to the extremely dense innervation of the arteries and veins posterior to the heart. The innervation pattern is consistent with known physiological adjustments to gravity and suggests a mechanism for regulating dependent blood flow via sympathetic nerves. In comparison to the posterior systemic arteries, parallel segments of pulmonary artery taken from the same body position of Elaphe contained a much sparser innervation by adrenergic nerves. The sparser innervation can be correlated with less gravitational disturbance in the pulmonary artery, which is relatively short in this and in other arboreal snakes.

History

Journal

Journal of morphology

Volume

198

Pagination

25-31

Location

Chichester, Eng.

ISSN

0362-2525

Language

eng

Publication classification

CN.1 Other journal article

Copyright notice

1988, Alan R. Liss

Issue

1

Publisher

John Wiley & Sons