Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

An empirical study on the relationship between intellectual ability and an understanding of the legal process in male remand prisoners

journal contribution
posted on 2004-06-01, 00:00 authored by F Parton, Andrew Day, J White
Research conducted in Australia and around the world in the last decade has shown that people with significant intellectual impairments are over-represented in all areas of the criminal justice system. They are particularly over-represented in remand populations appearing before court. Previous research has suggested that as many as one-quarter of offenders facing sentencing in court have difficulty in understanding court procedures and it is suspected that a majority of these individuals suffer a significant intellectual impairment. The purpose of this study was to establish whether remandees with significant intellectual impairments (IQ < 70) have an accurate understanding of the court system. Seventy-four remand prisoners took part in the study. Remandees with an IQ of less than 70 demonstrated a significantly poorer understanding of the court system than those remandees with an IQ of 70 and above. The implications of these results are discussed in relation to the need for law reform and diversionary practices for this population of remandees.

History

Journal

Psychiatry, psychology and law

Volume

11

Issue

1

Pagination

96 - 109

Publisher

Australian Academic Press

Location

Melbourne, Vic.

ISSN

1321-8719

eISSN

1934-1687

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal; C Journal article

Copyright notice

2004, Australian Academic Press

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Keywords

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC