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An evaluation of SecondBite®'s FoodMate®, a nutrition education and skill-building program aimed at reducing food insecurity

Version 2 2024-06-04, 00:37
Version 1 2019-10-10, 17:20
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-04, 00:37 authored by Lena StephensLena Stephens, G Smith, DL Olstad, Kylie BallKylie Ball
© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: Enhancing food skills and nutrition knowledge may help promote healthy eating among people who are food insecure. FoodMate® by SecondBite®, an 8-week nutrition education and food hamper program, focuses on developing food skills and independence among Australians at risk of/experiencing food insecurity. This study aimed to explore participants' perceptions of and experiences with FoodMate® over a long-term (up to 2 years) follow-up. Methods: For evaluation purposes, SecondBite® previously collected data from participants prior to (T1) and following completion (T2) of FoodMate®. This paper reports results from semi-structured telephone interviews conducted in a follow-up study (2016/2017, T3) among 19 adults enrolled in FoodMate® programs delivered in Victoria and New South Wales within the previous two years. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis of responses to T3 open-ended questions, and descriptive analysis of closed-ended question responses (T1 vs T2 vs T3). Results: Major qualitative themes included program enjoyment; perceived positive long-term program impact on participants' eating and related attitudes and skills; barriers to cooking; suggested program modifications; and impact on others. In descriptive quantitative analyses, participants' diet; confidence to cook using basic ingredients, follow simple recipes and try new foods; cooking and food-related skills; social engagement and life satisfaction all improved between T1 and T3. Conclusions: Overall, FoodMate® was well-received and associated with long-term positive changes in a range of outcomes. Wider implementation among vulnerable groups should be considered. So what?: Future health promotion initiatives could adopt FoodMate® to increase food skills and knowledge among adults experiencing food insecurity.

History

Journal

Health Promotion Journal of Australia

Volume

31

Pagination

468-481

Location

Australia

ISSN

1036-1073

eISSN

2201-1617

Language

English

Notes

In Press

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

3

Publisher

WILEY