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An obesogenic maternal environment impairs mouse growth patterns, satellite cell activation, and markers of postnatal myogenesis

journal contribution
posted on 01.12.2020, 00:00 authored by J Mikovic, C Brightwell, Angus LindsayAngus Lindsay, Y Wen, Greg KowalskiGreg Kowalski, Aaron RussellAaron Russell, C S Fry, Severine LamonSeverine Lamon
Skeletal muscle is sensitive to environmental cues that are first present in utero. Maternal overnutrition is a model of impaired muscle development leading to structural and metabolic dysfunction in adult life. In this study, we investigated the effect of an obesogenic maternal environment on growth and postnatal myogenesis in the offspring. Male C57BL/6J mice born to chow- or high-fat-diet-fed mothers were allocated to four different groups at the end of weaning. For the following 10 wk, half of the pups were maintained on the same diet as their mother and half of the pups were switched to the other diet (chow or high-fat). At 12 wk of age, muscle injury was induced using an intramuscular injection of barium chloride. Seven days later, mice were humanely killed and muscle tissue was harvested. A high-fat maternal diet impaired offspring growth patterns and downregulated satellite cell activation and markers of postnatal myogenesis 7 days after injury without altering the number of newly synthetized fibers over the whole 7-day period. Importantly, a healthy postnatal diet could not reverse any of these effects. In addition, we demonstrated that postnatal myogenesis was associated with a diet-independent upregulation of three miRNAs, mmu-miR-31–5p, mmu-miR-136–5p, and mmu-miR-296–5p. Furthermore, in vitro analysis confirmed the role of these miRNAs in myocyte proliferation. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that maternal overnutrition impairs markers of postnatal myogenesis in the offspring and are particularly relevant to today’s society where the incidence of overweight/obesity in women of childbearing age is increasing.

History

Journal

American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism

Volume

319

Issue

6

Pagination

E1008 - E1018

Publisher

American Physiological Society

Location

Bethesda, Md.

ISSN

0193-1849

eISSN

1522-1555

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal