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Antenatal depressive symptoms are strongly predicted by the severity of pre-menstrual syndrome: results of partial least squares analysis

journal contribution
posted on 2024-01-18, 04:52 authored by Y Abe, W Sirichokchatchawan, U Sangkomkamhang, S Satthapisit, M Maes
Background/Objective: Antenatal depression (AD) is the commonest morbidity during pregnancy. There is evidence that premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and AD share common immune-inflammatory and sex hormonal pathways. This study aims to evaluate the association between the severity of depressive PMS and AD in early and late pregnancy. Method: Participants were followed from early (<=16 weeks) to late pregnancy (>=20 weeks). The Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool (PSST) was used to assess PMS and AD symptoms were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Results: Up to 57.6% of the variance in the early EPDS score was explained by the regression on the first factor extracted from 10 depression and anxiety PSST items (dubbed the DepAnx PSST), insomnia PSST, relation dissatisfaction, and partner abuse. There were specific indirect effects of DepAnx PSST (p < 0.001), insomnia PSST (p = 0.041), relation dissatisfaction (p = 0.023) and partner abuse (p = 0.007) on the late EPDS which were mediated by the early EPDS score. Conclusion: The affective, but not psychosomatic, symptoms of PMS strongly predict AD symptoms suggesting that the pathophysiology of affective PMS symptoms overlap with those of AD.

History

Journal

International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology

Volume

23

Article number

100356

Pagination

100356-100356

Location

Spain

ISSN

1697-2600

eISSN

2174-0852

Language

en

Issue

2

Publisher

Elsevier BV