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Anti- HIV-1 activity of lactic acid in human cervicovaginal fluid

Version 3 2024-06-20, 00:09
Version 2 2024-06-03, 03:23
Version 1 2024-03-13, 01:13
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-20, 00:09 authored by D Tyssen, YY Wang, JA Hayward, Paul AgiusPaul Agius, K DeLong, M Aldunate, J Ravel, TR Moench, RA Cone, G Tachedjiana
The Lactobacillus -dominated vaginal microbiota is associated with a reduced risk of acquiring and transmitting HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Lactic acid is a major organic acid metabolite produced by lactobacilli that acidifies the vagina and has been reported to have inhibitory activity in vitro against bacterial, protozoan, and viral STIs, including HIV infections. However, the anti-HIV properties of lactic acid in native vaginal lumen fluids of women colonized with Lactobacillus spp. have not yet been established. Our study, using native cervicovaginal fluid from women, found that potent and irreversible anti-HIV-1 activity is significantly associated with the concentration of the protonated (acidic, uncharged) form of lactic acid. This work advances our understanding of the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota modulate HIV susceptibility and could lead to novel strategies to prevent women from acquiring HIV or transmitting the virus during vaginal intercourse and vaginal birth.

History

Journal

mSphere

Volume

3

Pagination

e00055-e00018

Location

United States

ISSN

2379-5042

eISSN

2379-5042

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Editor/Contributor(s)

Pascual DW

Issue

4

Publisher

American Society for Microbiology