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Application of machine learning in predicting non-alcoholic fatty liver disease using anthropometric and body composition indices

Version 3 2024-06-19, 18:09
Version 2 2024-06-06, 06:15
Version 1 2023-04-05, 02:44
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-19, 18:09 authored by F Razmpour, R Daryabeygi-Khotbehsara, D Soleimani, H Asgharnezhad, A Shamsi, GS Bajestani, M Nematy, MR Pour, Ralph MaddisonRalph Maddison, Shariful IslamShariful Islam
AbstractNon-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease, which can progress from simple steatosis to advanced cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Clinical diagnosis of NAFLD is crucial in the early stages of the disease. The main aim of this study was to apply machine learning (ML) methods to identify significant classifiers of NAFLD using body composition and anthropometric variables. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 513 individuals aged 13 years old or above in Iran. Anthropometric and body composition measurements were performed manually using body composition analyzer InBody 270. Hepatic steatosis and fibrosis were determined using a Fibroscan. ML methods including k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Radial Basis Function (RBF) SVM, Gaussian Process (GP), Random Forest (RF), Neural Network (NN), Adaboost and Naïve Bayes were examined for model performance and to identify anthropometric and body composition predictors of fatty liver disease. RF generated the most accurate model for fatty liver (presence of any stage), steatosis stages and fibrosis stages with 82%, 52% and 57% accuracy, respectively. Abdomen circumference, waist circumference, chest circumference, trunk fat and body mass index were among the most important variables contributing to fatty liver disease. ML-based prediction of NAFLD using anthropometric and body composition data can assist clinicians in decision making. ML-based systems provide opportunities for NAFLD screening and early diagnosis, especially in population-level and remote areas.

History

Journal

Scientific reports

Volume

13

Article number

4942

Pagination

1-13

Location

Berlin, Germany

ISSN

2045-2322

eISSN

2045-2322

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

1

Publisher

Springer

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