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Assessing the clinical competence of psychology students through Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs): student and staff views

journal contribution
posted on 01.02.2015, 00:00 authored by Jade SheenJade Sheen, Jane McGillivrayJane McGillivray, Clint Gurtman, L Boyd
Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) are a well-known, reliable, and valid assessment method used across the healthcare sector. In the present study, we applied OSCEs in three units within professional postgraduate psychology courses, with the broad aims of identifying staff and student perceptions of the assessment. At the conclusion of each OSCE, staff and students completed a feedback questionnaire that contained both scaled and open-ended questions. Results suggest that clinical psychology OSCEs can be stressful for students, but are also well regarded. Both staff and students felt that the OSCEs were realistic, valid, and aligned well with professional practice. Students reported differences in the way in which they prepared for the OSCEs compared with a written exam or other form of assessment, while staff noted that models of OSCE development must be flexible, to adequately assess the objectives of individual units. Further, because they can be a costly exercise, OSCEs need to be applied judiciously within the tertiary sector.

History

Journal

Australian psychologist

Volume

50

Issue

1

Pagination

51 - 59

Publisher

Wiley

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

0005-0067

eISSN

1742-9544

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article; C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2015, The Australian Psychological Society