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Association between sleep duration and mortality risk among adults with type 2 diabetes: a prospective cohort study

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posted on 2020-11-01, 00:00 authored by Y Wang, W Huang, A O’Neil, Y Lan, D Aune, W Wang, C Yu, X Chen
Abstract Aims/hypothesis This study aimed to investigate whether the effects of sleep duration interacted with the presence of diabetes. We specifically sought to examine the relationship between sleep duration and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in people with type 2 diabetes across sex, age at diagnosis, duration of diabetes and treatment type. Methods The sample consisted of 273,029 adults, including 248,817 without diabetes and 24,212 with type 2 diabetes, who participated in the National Health Interview Survey from 2004 to 2013 and whose data were linked to a mortality database up to 31 December 2015. Sleep duration was measured using self-report, whereby participants were asked ‘on average how long do you sleep each day (≤5, 6, 7, 8, 9 or ≥10 h/day)?’ The relationship between sleep duration and mortality risk was investigated using Cox proportional hazards regression model, with adjustments for demographics, BMI, lifestyle behaviours and clinical variables. Results Absolute mortality rate was higher in adults with diabetes and extremes of sleep duration (≤5 h/day, 215.0 per 10,000 person-years; ≥10 h/day, 363.5 per 10,000 person-years). There was a non-significant interaction between sleep duration and the presence of diabetes (p for interaction = 0.08). A J-shaped relationship existed between sleep duration and all-cause mortality risk in people with type 2 diabetes. Compared with the reference group (7 h/day), both shorter and longer sleep durations were associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality (≤5 h/day, HR 1.24 [95% CI 1.09, 1.40]; 6 h/day, HR 1.13 [1.01, 1.28]; 8 h/day, HR 1.17 [1.06, 1.30]; ≥10 h/day, HR 1.83 [1.61, 2.08]). Similar associations were also observed for mortality risk from CVD, cancer, kidney disease, Alzheimer’s disease and chronic lower respiratory diseases. Longer sleep duration in those with a younger age at diabetes onset was associated with greater risks of all-cause and CVD mortality. Shorter sleep duration in individuals treated with both insulin and oral glucose-lowering medication was also associated with higher risks of all-cause and CVD mortality. Conclusions/interpretation The associations between sleep duration and mortality risk may be different between diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. In people with type 2 diabetes, sleeping less or more than 7 h/day was associated with increased risk of all-cause and condition-specific mortality. The association was more prominent in those with a younger age at diabetes onset and receiving treatment with both oral glucose-lowering medication and insulin. This population may benefit from targeted sleep-related interventions to reduce the risks of adverse health outcomes.

History

Journal

Diabetologia

Volume

63

Pagination

2292-2304

Location

Germany

ISSN

0012-186X

eISSN

1432-0428

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Issue

11

Publisher

SPRINGER