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Associations between sedentary behaviours and dietary intakes among adolescents

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Version 2 2024-06-03, 18:25
Version 1 2018-02-01, 12:00
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 18:25 authored by EA Fletcher, Sarah McNaughtonSarah McNaughton, David CrawfordDavid Crawford, V Cleland, Jacqui Della GattaJacqui Della Gatta, J Hatt, J Dollman, Anna TimperioAnna Timperio
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the current study was to examine associations of individual and aggregated screen-based behaviours, and total sitting time, with healthy and unhealthy dietary intakes among adolescents. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of adolescents. Participants self-reported durations of television viewing, computer use, playing electronic games (e-games), total sitting time, daily servings of fruits and vegetables, and frequency of consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), diet beverages, fast foods and discretionary snacks. Logistic regression models were conducted to identify associations of screen-based behaviours, total screen time and total sitting time with dietary intakes. SETTING: Victoria, Australia. SUBJECTS: Adolescents (n 939) in School Year 11 (mean age 16·8 years). RESULTS: The results showed that watching television (≥2 h/d) was positively associated with consuming SSB and diet beverages each week and consuming discretionary snacks at least once daily, whereas computer use (≥2 h/d) was inversely associated with daily fruit and vegetable intake and positively associated with weekly fast-food consumption. Playing e-games (any) was inversely associated with daily vegetable intake and positively associated with weekly SSB consumption. Total screen (≥2 h/d) and sitting (h/d) times were inversely associated with daily fruit and vegetable consumption, with total screen time also positively associated with daily discretionary snack consumption and weekly consumption of SSB and fast foods. CONCLUSIONS: Individual and aggregated screen-based behaviours, as well as total sitting time, are associated with a number of indicators of healthy and unhealthy dietary intake. Future research should explore whether reducing recreational screen time improves adolescents' diets.

History

Journal

Public health nutrition

Volume

21

Pagination

1115-1122

Location

Cambridge, Eng.

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

1368-9800

eISSN

1475-2727

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2018, The Authors

Issue

6

Publisher

Cambridge University Press