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Associations of children's perceived neighborhood environments with walking and physical activity

journal contribution
posted on 01.01.2007, 00:00 authored by Clare Hume, Jo SalmonJo Salmon, Kylie BallKylie Ball
Purpose. To examine associations between children's perceptions of the neighborhood environment and walking and physical activity.
Design. Cross-sectional study of a school-based sample.
Setting. Elementary schools in Melbourne, Australia.
Subjects. 280 children aged 10 years (response rate 78%).
Measures. A self-report survey assessed children's perceptions of the neighborhood physical and social environments and their weekly walking frequency. Physical activity was also objectively measured using accelerometers.
Results. Multiple linear regression analyses showed a positive association between walking frequency and the number of accessible destinations in the neighborhood among boys; having a neighborhood that was easy to walk/cycle around and perceiving lots of graffiti were positively associated with walking frequency among girls. Perceiving lots of litter and rubbish was positively associated with boys' overall physical activity, but no environmental variables were associated with girls' overall physical activity.
Conclusion. Several different environmental factors were associated with walking and physical activity. Perceptions of the neighborhood environment were more strongly associated with girls' walking than with objectively-measured physical activity. Future studies should confirm these findings using objective measures and prospective study designs.

History

Journal

American journal of health promotion

Volume

21

Issue

3

Pagination

201 - 207

Publisher

American Journal of Health Promotion

Location

Birmingham, MI

ISSN

0890-1171

eISSN

2168-6602

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2007 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.