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Audiohaptic feedback enhances motor performance in a low-fidelity simulated drilling task

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posted on 2020-01-01, 00:00 authored by Brianna L Grant, Paul YielderPaul Yielder, Tracey A Patrick, Bill Kapralos, Michael Williams-Bell, Bernadette A Murphy
When used in educational settings, simulations utilizing virtual reality (VR) technologies can reduce training costs while providing a safe and effective learning environment. Tasks can be easily modified to maximize learning objectives of different levels of trainees (e.g., novice, intermediate, expert), and can be repeated for the development of psychomotor skills. VR offers a multisensory experience, providing visual, auditory, and haptic sensations with varying levels of fidelity. While simulating visual and auditory stimuli is relatively easy and cost-effective, similar representations of haptic sensation still require further development. Evidence suggests that mixing high- and low-fidelity realistic sensations (e.g., audition and haptic) can improve the overall perception of realism, however, whether this also leads to improved performance has not been examined. The current study examined whether audiohaptic stimuli presented in a virtual drilling task can lead to improved motor performance and subjective realism, compared to auditory stimuli alone. Right-handed participants (n = 16) completed 100 drilling trials of each stimulus type. Performance measures indicated that participants overshot the target during auditory trials, and undershot the target during audiohaptic trials. Undershooting is thought to be indicative of improved performance, optimizing both time and energy requirements.

History

Journal

Brain Sciences

Volume

10

Issue

1

Article number

21

Publisher

MDPI AG

Location

Basel, Switzerland

eISSN

2076-3425

Language

eng

Notes

This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Body in Brain Plasticity

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2019, The Authors

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