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Australian healthcare professionals' knowledge of and attitudes toward binge eating disorder

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journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-18, 03:28 authored by B Cain, K Buck, Matthew Fuller-TyszkiewiczMatthew Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, I Krug
Objective: This study aimed to investigate Australian healthcare practitioners' knowledge and attitudes toward binge eating disorder (BED). Method: Participants were 175 healthcare professionals, who were randomized to one of two conditions that assessed diagnostic and treatment knowledge of either comorbid BED and obesity or only obesity via case vignette, as well as weight bias toward obese patients. Results: Results suggested that participants demonstrated a reluctance to diagnose comorbid BED and obesity, that their knowledge of physical complications associated with BED was limited, and that they indicated a narrow range of evidence-based treatment options. When compared with levels of weight bias expressed by healthcare professionals in previous international studies, Australian clinicians were significantly less biased, however, still largely endorsed 'negative' attitudes toward obesity. Conclusion: Findings suggest that future clinical training in eating disorders should therefore focus not only on diagnostic criteria, physical complications and treatment options, but also on practitioner attitudes toward eating and weight.

History

Journal

Frontiers in Psychology

Volume

8

Article number

ARTN 1291

Pagination

1 - 11

Location

Switzerland

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

1664-1078

eISSN

1664-1078

Language

English

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2017, Cain, Buck, Fuller-Tyszkiewicz and Krug.

Issue

AUG

Publisher

FRONTIERS MEDIA SA