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Autobiographical memory and depression: identity-continuity and problem-solving functions indirectly predict symptoms over time through psychological well-being

journal contribution
posted on 01.03.2016, 00:00 authored by David HallfordDavid Hallford, David MellorDavid Mellor
The aim of this study was to assess the longitudinal associations between adaptive autobiographical memory functions and depressive symptoms. Consistent with the proposed mechanisms of change underpinning cognitive-reminiscence therapy (CRT), it was hypothesised that more frequent adaptive reminiscence would lead to increases in psychological resources over time and indirectly affect depressive symptoms through this pathway. A sample of 171 young adults (mean age=25.9years, SD=3.5) completed measures of how frequently they utilised autobiographical memory for identity-continuity and problem-solving purposes, depressive symptoms and personal resources (self-esteem, self-efficacy, meaning in life and optimism) at two time-points. The results of structural equation modelling supported the model of indirect influence between reminiscence functions and depression through these psychological resources. These findings clarify the effects of adaptive autobiographical memory on depressive symptoms in young adults and indicate potential benefits of interventions such as CRT.

History

Journal

Applied cognitive psychology

Volume

30

Issue

2

Pagination

152 - 159

Publisher

Wiley

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

0888-4080

eISSN

1099-0720

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article; C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2015, John Wiley