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Bimanual co-ordination in Parkinson's disease

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journal contribution
posted on 01.04.1998, 00:00 authored by K A Johnson, R Cunnington, J L Bradshaw, J G Phillips, R Iansek, Mark RogersMark Rogers
The basal ganglia may be involved in bimanual co-ordination. Parkinson's disease (which impairs basal ganglia output) is clinically reported to cause difficulties in the performance of co-ordinated bimanual movements. Nevertheless, any bimanual co-ordination difficulties may be task specific, as experimental observations are equivocal. To infer the role of the basal ganglia in co-ordinating the two arms, this study investigated the bimanual co-ordination of patients with Parkinson's disease. Sixteen Parkinson's disease patients and matched control subjects performed a bimanual cranking task, at different speeds (1 and 2 Hz) and phase relationships. All subjects performed the required bimanual in-phase movement on a pair of cranks, at fast (2 Hz) and slow (1 Hz) speeds. However, the Parkinson's disease patients were unable to perform the asymmetrical anti-phase movement, in which rotation of the cranks differed by 180 degrees, at either speed; but instead reverted to the in-phase symmetrical movement. For Parkinson's disease patients, performance of the in-phase movement was more accurate and stable when an external timing cue was used; however, for anti-phase movement, the external cue accentuated the tendency for patients to revert to more symmetrical, in-phase movements.

History

Journal

Brain

Volume

121

Issue

4

Pagination

743 - 753

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Location

Oxford, Eng.

ISSN

0006-8950

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

1998, Oxford University Press