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Biocompatibility and modification of the protein-based adhesive secreted by the Australian frog Notaden bennetti

journal contribution
posted on 01.05.2010, 00:00 authored by L D Graham, S J Danon, G Johnson, C Braybrook, N K Hart, Russell VarleyRussell Varley, M D M Evans, G A McFarland, M J Tyler, J A Werkmeister, J A M Ramshaw
When provoked, Notaden bennetti frogs secrete a proteinaceous exudate, which rapidly forms a tacky and elastic glue. This material has potential in biomedical applications. Cultured cells attached and proliferated well on glue-coated tissue culture polystyrene, but migrated somewhat slower than on uncoated surfaces. In organ culture, dissolved glue successfully adhered collagen-coated perfluoropolyether lenses to debrided bovine corneas and supported epithelial regrowth. Small pellets of glue implanted subcutaneously into mice were resorbed by surrounding tissues, and all of the animals made a full recovery. An initial but transient skin necrosis at the implant site was probably caused by some of the potentially toxic metabolites present in the frog secretion; these include sterols and carotenoids, as well as fatty alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, acids, and aromatic compounds. Removal of the carotenoid pigments did not significantly alter the glue's material properties. In contrast, peroxidase treatment of dissolved glue introduced unnatural crosslinks between molecules of the major protein (Nb-1R) and resulted in the formation of a soft hydrogel, which was very different to the original material.

History

Journal

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A

Volume

93

Issue

2

Pagination

429 - 441

Publisher

Wiley

Location

United States

ISSN

1549-3296

eISSN

1552-4965

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2009 Wiley Periodicals