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CAN AN INTERVAL-BASED RUNNING EXERCISE INTERVENTION IMPROVE LUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC HEALTH? THE ASTEROID RANDOMISED CONTROL TRIAL

journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-24, 03:32 authored by Claire L Samanna, Christopher Neason, Scott Tagliaferri, Daniel Belavy, A Prof Steven J Bowe, Matthew Clarkson, A Prof Daniel Connell, Ms Emma A Craige, Romina Gollan, Luana MainLuana Main, Clint MillerClint Miller, Ulrike Mitchell, Niamh MundellNiamh Mundell, David ScottDavid Scott, Jamie TaitJamie Tait, Grace E Vincent, Patrick Owen
BACKGROUND AND AIMS Low back pain is the leading cause of global disability, with lumbar disc pathologies estimated to contribute to up to 40% of cases. Exercise training is an established treatment to reduce pain intensity and disability in individuals with low back pain; however, the effect of exercise training on intervertebral discs is unknown. Cross-sectional studies have shown that endurance running (>50km per week) is associated with healthier intervertebral discs, as evidenced by greater T2-relaxation (hydration) and intervertebral disc height. However, no studies have explored the relationship between running and disc health prospectively. This study aims to examine the impact of a 12-week progressive run-walk exercise intervention on intervertebral disc health in individuals with chronic low back pain. METHODS Forty individuals with non-specific low back pain were enrolled in a 12-week parallel randomised control trial and allocated to either a digitally-delivered progressive run-walk interval exercise intervention (supervised by an accredited exercise physiologist) or waitlist control. All participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks to examine intervertebral disc health (e.g. T2-relaxation, intervertebral disc height, Pfirrmann grade). RESULTS Thirty-nine participants (20 intervention and 19 waitlist control; mean [SD] age: 33 [6] years, female: 50%) underwent MRI at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. At baseline, intervertebral disc outcomes were no different in either group (T2-relaxation[ms] mean[SD]:81.07[6.61] and 85.11[9.33]; p=0.939, height[mm] mean[SD]: 8.77[0.87] and 9.03[0.90]; p=0.819, respectively). Six and 12-week outcomes are currently being analysed and results will be available for presentation at the conference. CONCLUSION This randomised control trial will provide world-first evidence on the effects of a progressive run-walk exercise intervention on lumbar intervertebral disc health in adults with non-specific chronic low back pain. Should this intervention prove effective, findings will have marked implications for current guidelines and clinical management of this debilitating chronic condition.

History

Journal

Journal of Clinical Exercise Physiology

Volume

13

Pagination

384-384

ISSN

2165-6193

eISSN

2165-7629

Language

en

Publication classification

E3.1 Extract of paper

Issue

s2

Publisher

Clinical Exercise Physiology Association