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Cadaveric vs. live-donor kidney transplants : theoretical foundations of interaction between institutions and inequality

journal contribution
posted on 2007-01-01, 00:00 authored by Nejat AnbarciNejat Anbarci, M Caglayan
In 1991, the World Health Assembly approved a set of Guiding Principles which emphasize voluntary donation, non-commercialization and a preference for cadavers over living donors” (World Health Organization). The objective of this paper is to identify the factors that affect the ratio of cadaveric transplants to all transplants. This paper first provides informational background on problems surrounding kidney transplants and then uses a theoretical framework which employs standard economic assumptions but incorporates a setup where the persons needing kidneys can obtain it from their compatible relatives or purchase it from individuals who are willing to sell one of their kidneys. The methods of economic theoretical analyses are used where following definitions and assumptions some conclusions are drawn. This paper finds that factors such as inequality, rule of law and religion have significant effect on the ratio of cadaveric transplants to all transplants. The paper concludes that improvement in equality and in rule of law will increase the use of cadaveric kidney transplants. In addition, fighting religious beliefs against cadaveric kidney transplants too will lead to a higher ratio of cadaveric transplants to all transplants.

History

Journal

Public administration and management

Volume

12

Issue

2

Pagination

47 - 77

Publisher

Public Administration and Management

Location

Elizabethtown, Pa.

ISSN

1087-0091

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2007, Public Administration and Management

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