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Chemosensory properties of pungent spices: their role in altering nutrient intake

Version 2 2024-06-03, 06:45
Version 1 2018-06-22, 14:13
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 06:45 authored by MJ Ludy, RM Tucker, Sze Yen TanSze Yen Tan
© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Background: The general population is not compliant with national dietary recommendations for promoting health and reducing chronic disease risk. While rising obesity rates suggest that the majority of the population is overconsuming, many individuals affected with either acute or chronic diseases struggle to maintain adequate dietary intake and are at high nutritional risk. Flavor is the primary driver of food intake; however, disliked flavors are a major barrier to consumer adherence with dietary recommendations for both groups. Spices that contribute to chemical burn—such as black pepper, garlic, ginger, mustard, oregano, red pepper, and wasabi—alter food flavors. Purpose: This paper explores the role of these pungent spices in altering nutrient intake across the lifespan. The role of chemical burn in manipulating dietary intake in both diseased and healthy populations is discussed. Application: Implications for using pungent spices to enhance compliance with dietary manipulations are described. Proposed functions of pungent spices are maintaining, preserving, and enhancing flavor to offset the reductions in liking and palatability that are associated with dietary modifications and disease status.

History

Journal

Chemosensory perception

Volume

8

Pagination

131-137

Location

New York, N.Y.

ISSN

1936-5802

eISSN

1936-5810

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York

Issue

3

Publisher

Springer