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Childhood cruelty to animals in China: the relationship with psychological adjustment and family functioning

journal contribution
posted on 01.09.2013, 00:00 authored by Jessica Wong, David MellorDavid Mellor, Ben Richardson, X Xu
Background
The current study broadened the general scope of research conducted on childhood cruelty to animals by examining the association between psychological adjustment, family functioning and animal cruelty in an Eastern context, China.

Method
The mothers and fathers of 729 children attending primary school in Chengdu, China participated in this study. Each parent completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, the Chinese Family Assessment Instrument, and the Children's Attitudes and Behaviours towards Animals questionnaire.

Results

Findings from an actor partner interdependence model demonstrated that parents' ratings of family functioning and of their child's externalizing coping style predicted only modest amounts of variance in animal cruelty. In particular, parents' ratings of their child's externalizing coping style most consistently predicted animal cruelty. Family functioning, fathers' ratings in particular, played a minor role, more so for boys compared with girls.

Conclusion

This study provided the first insight into childhood animal cruelty in China, and suggests that further research may enhance our understanding of these phenomena.

History

Journal

Child : care, health and development

Volume

39

Issue

5

Pagination

668 - 675

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell Publishing

Location

Chichester, England

ISSN

0305-1862

eISSN

1365-2214

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2013, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing