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Choosing a sampling frequency for ECG QRS detection using convolutional networks.

journal contribution
posted on 2023-10-24, 04:51 authored by A Habib, Chandan KarmakarChandan Karmakar, John YearwoodJohn Yearwood
Automated QRS detection methods depend on the ECG data which is sampled at a certain frequency, irrespective of filter-based traditional methods or convolutional network (CNN) based deep learning methods. These methods require a selection of the sampling frequency at which they operate in the very first place. While working with data from two different datasets, which are sampled at different frequencies, often, data from both the datasets may need to resample at a common target frequency, which may be the frequency of either of the datasets or could be a different one. However, choosing data sampled at a certain frequency may have an impact on the model's generalisation capacity, and complexity. There exist some studies that investigate the effects of ECG sample frequencies on traditional filter-based methods, however, an extensive study of the effect of ECG sample frequency on deep learning-based models (convolutional networks), exploring their generalisability and complexity is yet to be explored. This experimental research investigates the impact of six different sample frequencies (50, 100, 250, 500, 1000, and 2000Hz) on four different convolutional network-based models' generalisability and complexity in order to form a basis to decide on an appropriate sample frequency for the QRS detection task for a particular performance requirement. Intra-database tests report an accuracy improvement no more than approximately 0.6\% from 100Hz to 250Hz and the shorter interquartile range for those two frequencies for all CNN-based models. The findings reveal that convolutional network-based deep learning models are capable of scoring higher levels of detection accuracies on ECG signals sampled at frequencies as low as 100Hz or 250Hz while maintaining lower model complexity (number of trainable parameters and training time).

History

Journal

arXiv

Pagination

1-15

Location

Ithaca, New York

Language

English

Publication classification

CN Other journal article

Publisher

Cornell University

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