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Colonial girls' literature and the politics of archives in the digital age

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journal contribution
posted on 2012-01-01, 00:00 authored by Michelle Smith, Kristine MoruziKristine Moruzi
In this paper we examine the politics of print and digital archives and their implications for research in the field of historical children's literature. We use the specific example of our comparative, collaborative project 'From Colonial to Modern: Transnational Girlhood in Australian, New Zealand and Canadian Print Cultures, 1840-1940' to contrast the strengths and limitations of print and digital archives of young people's texts from these three nations. In particular, we consider how the failure of some print archives to collect ephemeral or non-canonical colonial texts may be reproduced in current digitising projects. Similarly, we examine how gaps in the newly forged digital "canon" are especially large for colonial children's texts because of the commercial imperatives of many large-scale digitisation projects. While we acknowledge the revolutionary applications of digital repositories for research on historical children's literature, we also argue that these projects may unintentionally marginalise or erase certain kinds of children's texts from scholarly view in the future.

History

Journal

Papers: exploration into children's literature

Volume

22

Pagination

33 - 42

Location

Victoria Park, W.A.

Open access

  • Yes

ISSN

1034-9243

eISSN

1837-4530

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2012, Magpies Magazine

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