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Communicative competence of oral deaf children while explaining game rules

journal contribution
posted on 2018-10-01, 00:00 authored by Dianne Toe, Louise PaatschLouise Paatsch
Classrooms are characterized by interactions in a range of genres. The concise language required by expository interactions can be challenging for children who have atypical language, including children who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHH). This study compared the way three groups of upper primary school students (aged 8-13 years) taught a peer to play a new unfamiliar board game: (a) DHH "experts" teaching a "novice" hearing peer; (b) hearing experts teaching a DHH novice; and (c) a hearing expert teaching a hearing novice. All DHH students were enrolled in mainstream schools and used spoken language as the main mode of communication. All three groups were able to convey game rules and purpose, and navigate clarifications. Differences emerged in the accuracy of the use of referents when instructing their peers how to play the game. The specific content vocabulary and the need to emphasize new concise information also challenged the DHH children. This study highlights the importance of including expository tasks in language support and intervention for children who are DHH.

History

Journal

Journal of deaf studies and deaf education

Volume

23

Issue

4

Pagination

369 - 381

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Location

Oxford, Eng.

eISSN

1465-7325

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2018, The Authors