Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

Comparative genetic variability in HIV-1 subtype C p24 Gene in early age groups of infants

Version 2 2024-06-03, 17:13
Version 1 2020-06-01, 12:43
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 17:13 authored by U Sharma, Sunil GuptaSunil Gupta, S Venkatesh, A Rai, AC Dhariwal, M Husain
It is important to study the molecular properties of vertically transmitted viruses in early infancy to understand disease progression. P24 having an important role in virus assembly and maturation was selected to explore the genotypic characteristics. Blood samples, obtained from 82 HIV-1 positive infants, were categorized into acute (≤ 6 months) and early (> 6–18 months) age groups. Of the 82 samples, 79 gave amplification results for p24, which were then sequenced and analysed. Amino acid heterogeneity analysis showed that substitutions were more frequent. Several substitution mutations were present in some of the sequences of both the age groups in the functional motifs of the gene namely Beta hairpin, CyPA binding loop, residues L136 and L190, linker region and major homology region. In the acute age group, an insertion of Asparagine residue (N5NL6) was observed in the β hairpin region in one of the sequences. This insertion was accompanied with analogous substitutions of N5Q, Q7L and G8R. In the early age group, a deletion of two residues; VK181−182, was observed at the C-terminal end in one of the sequences. These mutations may impair the structure of the protein leading to defective virus assembly. Protein variation effect analyzer software showed that deleterious mutations were more in the acute than the early age group. Variability analysis revealed that the amino acid heterogeneity was comparatively higher in the acute than the early age group. Variability in the virus was decreasing with the increasing age of the infants indicating that the virus is gradually evolving under positive selection pressure. HLA class 1 binding peptide analysis showed that the epitopes TPQDLNTML and RMYSPVSIL may be helpful in designing epitope based vaccine.

History

Journal

Virus genes

Volume

54

Pagination

647-661

Location

[New York, N.Y.]

ISSN

0920-8569

eISSN

1572-994X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Publisher

Springer

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC