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Cost-effectiveness of recruitment methods in a population-based epidemiological study: the Melbourne Visual Impairment Project

Version 2 2024-06-03, 09:55
Version 1 2016-03-10, 11:39
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 09:55 authored by Trish LivingstonTrish Livingston, CS Guest, A Bateman, N Woodcock, HR Taylor
The cost-effectiveness of five recruitment methods was evaluated to determine the best method of encouraging eligible persons to participate in the Melbourne Visual Impairment Project (a population-based epidemiological study). The evaluation was divided into two phases. Phase 1 included one of two types of initial contact, by direct personal contact or by telephone. Phase 2 involved recruiting residents after an attempt had been made by either the telephone or the doorstep approach, and included a second attempt by a field interviewer, subsequent attempts by senior field staff, and finally, financial incentives. The cost-effectiveness of each method was determined by dividing the approach's cost by the effectiveness ratio. We identified 269 eligible households with 356 eligible residents. An 89 per cent response rate was achieved at the examination centre, comprising 61 per cent from Phase 1 and 28 per cent from Phase 2. Although both recruitment methods in Phase 1 were equally cost-effective, there was a significant difference in the effectiveness of each method in actually recruiting residents. The doorstep method was more costly per attender but was far more effective at 76 per cent recruitment than the telephone method at 47 per cent (P < 0.001). We have demonstrated a practical two-stage approach (the doorstep method in Phase 1 and follow-up strategies in Phase 2) to population-based recruitment involving the middle to elderly age group that should be relevant to many epidemiological studies.

History

Journal

Australian and New Zealand journal of public health

Volume

18

Pagination

314-318

Location

London, Eng.

ISSN

1035-7319

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

1994, Public Health Association of Australia

Issue

3

Publisher

Wiley