Deakin University
Browse

File(s) not publicly available

Dark

Version 2 2024-06-04, 15:39
Version 1 2021-05-10, 08:19
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-04, 15:39 authored by Luke HeemsbergenLuke Heemsbergen, Alexia Maddox, Toija CinqueToija Cinque, Amelia Johns, Robert Gehl
This issue of M/C Journal rejects the association of darkness with immorality. In digital communication, the possibilities of darkness are greater than simple fears of what is hidden in online networks. Instead, new work in an emerging field of “dark social” studies’ consider “dark” as holding the potential for autonomy away from the digital visibilities that pervade economic, political, and surveillance logics of the present age. We shall not be afraid of the dark. We start from a technical rather than moral definition of darkness (Gehl), a definition that conceives of dark spaces as having legitimacies and anonymities against structural surveillance. At the same time, breaking away from techno-centric critiques of the dark allows a humanisation of how dark is embodied and performed at individual and structural levels. Other readings of digitally mediated dark (Fisher and Bolter) suggest tensions between exploitative potentials and deep societal reflection, and the ability for a new dark age (Bridle) to allow us to explore unknown potentials. Together these perspectives allow our authors a way to use dark to question and upend the unresting pressure and acceptance of—and hierarchy given to—the light in aesthetics of power and social transformation.

History

Alternative title

Dark

Journal

M/C Journal

Volume

24

Pagination

1-1

Location

Brisbane, Qld.

ISSN

1441-2616

eISSN

1441-2616

Language

eng

Publication classification

C4 Letter or note

Issue

2

Publisher

Queensland University of Technology