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Deepening understandings of Bourdieu’s academic and intellectual capital through a study of academic voice within academic governance

journal contribution
posted on 2018-01-01, 00:00 authored by Julie Rowlands
This article presents comparative empirical data from England, the US and Australia on academic boards (also known as faculty senates or academic senates) to highlight ways in which changes within contemporary academic governance effect a diminution of academic voice within decision making about and that affects teaching and research. Drawing on Bourdieu’s notions of academic and intellectual capital it highlights the limited capacity of analyses of university power relations that are predicated upon managerial and collegial governance as being at opposite ends of a spectrum to account for the multiple academics who have taken up line management or executive-level roles, and the many practising academics who undertake quite substantial administrative roles alongside their teaching and research. The article concludes by arguing that a more nuanced reading of Bourdieu’s academic and intellectual capital, combined with his concept of the divided habitus, offers significant potential for a deeper understanding of the complex ways in which the asymmetries of power within universities are developed and maintained. In turn, this opens the way to transformational academic governance practices that could reassert academic voice within decision making about academic matters.

History

Journal

Studies in higher education

Volume

43

Issue

11

Pagination

1823 - 1836

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Location

Abingdon, Eng.

ISSN

0307-5079

eISSN

1470-174X

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article; C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2017, Society for Research into Higher Education