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Delight and revolution: Literary studies, aesthetics and ideology

journal contribution
posted on 2013-06-01, 00:00 authored by Lyn Mc CreddenLyn Mc Credden
This is not an essay claiming that literature should be the impetus for political (subversive, revisionary, transforming) acts. Nor is it an essay promoting the desire for literature to align itself with political/ ideological positions. Well before Trotsky's Revolution and Literature, and stretching back to Plato's famous diatribe against the danger of poets in Book X of The Republic, critics have discoursed variously on the relationship of literature and ideology; on the political springs of art; on politics' debt to artists; or the subversive effects of art; or on art as labour. In 2012, French cultural theorist Jacques Ranciere's The Politics of Aesthetics: The Distribution of the Sensible continues the application of his concept of 'dissensus', arguing for the politically transformative effects of art, art's 'thinking the unthinkable'.

History

Journal

Australian Literary Studies

Volume

28

Pagination

125-139

Location

Wollongong, N.S.W.

ISSN

0004-9697

eISSN

1837-6479

Language

eng

Publication classification

C2 Other contribution to refereed journal

Issue

1-2

Publisher

University of Queensland Press

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