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Detection thresholds for four different fatty stimuli are associated with increased dietary intake of processed high-caloric food

Version 2 2024-06-04, 02:53
Version 1 2018-05-30, 11:34
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-04, 02:53 authored by JM Heinze, Andrew CostanzoAndrew Costanzo, I Baselier, A Fritsche, S Frank-Podlech, Russell KeastRussell Keast
BMI-specific differences in food choice and energy intake have been suggested to modulate taste perception. However, associations between body composition and fat taste sensitivity are controversial. The objective of this study was to examine the association between body composition, dietary intake and detection thresholds of four fatty stimuli (oleic acid, paraffin oil, canola oil, and canola oil spiked with oleic acid) that could be perceived via gustatory and/or textural cues. In 30 participants, fat detection thresholds were determined in a repeated measurements design over twelve days. Weight status was examined by measuring the participants' BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio. The habitual food intake was assessed via several questionnaires and twelve, non-consecutive 24-hour food diaries. In this study, a negative correlation was found between fat detection thresholds and the intake of food rich in vitamins and fibre. Moreover, a positive correlation was identified between the intake of high-fat food and fat detection thresholds. No differences in fat detection thresholds were observed due to variations in BMI or waist-to-hip ratio. These findings indicate that a regular intake of fatty foods might decrease an individuals' perceptual response to fats which might lead to excess fat intake on the long term.

History

Journal

Appetite

Volume

123

Pagination

7-13

Location

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

ISSN

0195-6663

eISSN

1095-8304

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal, C Journal article

Copyright notice

2017, Elsevier Ltd

Publisher

Elsevier

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