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Determinants of depressive mood states in everyday life: an experience sampling study

Version 2 2024-06-04, 00:02
Version 1 2017-07-26, 10:33
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-04, 00:02 authored by Matthew Fuller-TyszkiewiczMatthew Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, T Karvounis, R Pemberton, L Hartley-Clark, B Richardson
This study tests relative contributions and time-course of proposed risk/protective factors (e.g., stress, coping, and lack of social interactions) for influencing depressed mood states in daily life. Seventy-three participants completed baseline measurement of major depressive disorder symptomatology, followed by smartphone app-based monitoring of momentary experiences of depressed mood and risk/protective factors for 7 days. All predictors had deteriorating impacts on mood as lag increased, and the optimal lag appears to be less than 120 min. Linear decay in effect sizes was found for physical activity, social interaction, and tiredness, whereas exponential decline in effect sizes was found for stress and coping ability. Stress, coping, and depressed mood at the prior time-point were the best predictors of subsequent mood. These effects did not differ as a function of trait depressive symptom severity. Findings highlight the influence of spacing of assessments in identification and magnitude of predictors of mood states, and provide insights into key drivers of change in mood and their time-course.

History

Journal

Motivation and Emotion

Volume

41

Pagination

510-521

Location

New York, N.Y.

ISSN

0146-7239

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York

Issue

4

Publisher

Springer New York LLC