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Dietary approaches for weight loss with increased intakes of fruit, vegetables and dairy products

journal contribution
posted on 2008-06-01, 00:00 authored by Alison BoothAlison Booth, Caryl NowsonCaryl Nowson, Tony WorsleyTony Worsley, Claire MargerisonClaire Margerison, Michelle K Jorna
Aim: To assess the effectiveness of specific advice for increasing fruit, vegetable and dairy intake in free-living men participating in a weight loss study.

Methods: Subjects were randomised to one of two 12-week weight loss diets, either the WELL with daily targets of four serves of fruit, four serves of vegetables and three serves of dairy or a low fat diet (LF) with general advice to increase fruit and vegetable intake. Three-day food group diaries and a food frequency questionnaire assessed intake.

Results: Fifty-four overweight/obese male adults completed the study (WELL, n = 27; LF, n = 27; body mass index (mean ± standard deviation), 30.4 ± 2.5 kg/m2; age, 47.7 ± 9.5 years). There was no difference in mean weight change between groups (WELL, −4.8 ± 3.3 kg; LF, −4.6 ± 3.1 kg). Subjects on the WELL diet had greater (mean difference ± standard error) fruit (0.7 ± 0.2 serves/day), vegetable (1.2 ± 0.2 serves/day) and dairy (1.1 ± 0.1 serves/day) intakes than the LF group (measured by the food group diaries) (all P < 0.01). The WELL group reached the daily target for fruit from week 1 (4.7 ± 1.4 serves/day), vegetables by week 6 (4.1 ± 1.5 serves/day) and for dairy by week 8 (3.0 ± 0.8 serves/day).

Conclusions:
Providing specific dietary targets to men for weight loss appears to promote greater consumption of fruit, vegetable and dairy foods than providing general dietary advice. Meeting dietary targets appears to require different adjustment periods depending on the food type.

History

Journal

Nutrition and dietetics

Volume

65

Issue

2

Pagination

115 - 120

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia

Location

Brisbane, Qld.

ISSN

1446-6368

eISSN

1747-0080

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2008, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia