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Digital Education to Limit Salt in the Home (DELISH) Program improves knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors among children

OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of a Web-based salt reduction program on children's salt-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors (KABs), self-efficacy, and intake of dietary salt. DESIGN: Pretest and posttest. An online survey determined KABs and self-efficacy and a 24-hour urine collection revealed salt intake. SETTING: Victoria, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Child-parent dyads (n = 102) recruited from 5 government schools. INTERVENTION: A 5-week behavior-based education program delivered via weekly online interactive education sessions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Change in KABs, self-efficacy, and daily salt intake. ANALYSIS: Changes in outcomes were assessed using McNemar test, paired t test, and Cohen's δ (CD). RESULTS: A total of 83 children participated (mean age, 9.2 years [SD, 0.8 years]; 59% girls); 35% to 76% of children viewed weekly education session. Children with complete survey data (n = 75) had improved scores for salt-related knowledge (+3.6 ± 0.4 points; P < .001; CD: 1.16), behaviors (+1.3 ± 0.1 points; P < .001; CD: 1.08), and self-efficacy (+0.9 ± 0.2 points; P < .001; CD: 0.64), but not attitude. Children with valid urine collections (n = 51) showed no change in salt intake. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Participation resulted in improvement of salt related knowledge, self-efficacy and behavior. Further research is required to confirm these results using a more robust study design which includes a control group. In addition, the long term impact on children's salt intakes of comparable education programs needs to be assessed.

History

Journal

Journal of nutrition education and behavior

Volume

50

Issue

6

Pagination

547 - 554

Publisher

Elsevier

Location

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

eISSN

1878-2620

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2018, Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior.