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Digital public criminology in Australia and New Zealand: results from a mixed methods study of criminologists' use of social media

journal contribution
posted on 01.01.2019, 00:00 authored by Mark WoodMark Wood, Imogen RichardsImogen Richards, Mary IliadisMary Iliadis, Michael McDermott
The proliferation of social media in the so-called ‘post-broadcast era’ has profoundly altered the terrain for researchers to produce public scholarship and engage with the public. To date, however, the impact of social media on public criminology has not been subject to empirical inquiry. Drawing from a dataset of 116 survey responses and nine interviews, our mixed methods study addresses this opening by examining how criminologists in Australia and New Zealand have employed social media to engage in newsmaking and public criminology. This article presents findings from survey questions that assess the practices and perceptions of criminologists in relation to social media, and insights from an analysis that explores the political, ethical, and logistical issues raised by respondents. These issues include the democratising potential of social media in criminological research, and its ability to provide representation for historically marginalised populations. Questions pertaining to ‘newsmaking criminology’ and the wider performance of ‘public criminology’ are also addressed.

History

Journal

International journal for crime, justice and social democracy

Volume

8

Issue

4

Pagination

1 - 17

Publisher

Queensland University of Technology

Location

Brisbane, Qld

ISSN

2202-7998

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2019, The Authors