Deakin University
Browse

File(s) under permanent embargo

Dipteran attraction to a variety of baits: Implications for trapping studies as a tool for establishing seasonal presence of significant species

Version 2 2024-06-06, 07:13
Version 1 2019-04-16, 15:17
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-06, 07:13 authored by Michelle HarveyMichelle Harvey, Natalie GaszNatalie Gasz, Z Woolley, L Roberts, Nynke RavenNynke Raven, A Colbert, K Law, P Marshall, S Voss
Abstract Monitoring and collection of fly taxa (Diptera: Calliphoridae; Muscidae; Sarcophagidae) of medical, veterinary, and agricultural importance is often routine practice, providing data on target species presence, distribution and abundance. Collection practices currently involve baited trapping and while an inherent bias accompanying the choice of bait is acknowledged, there is little consistency in bait choice between studies and insufficient assessment of trapping success rates for bait types in current use. This study aimed to examine the effect of bait choice on trapping results for six commonly used bait types; a commercial bait (Envirosafe Fly Attractant, Envirosafe Products) and a combination of mixtures of liver, horse manure and 5% sodium sulfide (Na2S). Trapping success was compared under different seasonal conditions (Summer, Autumn, and Spring) to determine the most attractive bait for calliphorid species, with a secondary comparison of kangaroo versus ox liver occurring under summer conditions. Baits containing Na2S were the most successful in captures of all target taxa, with the addition of manure desirable, yielding increased diversity of taxa. Kangaroo liver baits attracted high numbers of Chrysomya spp. (Robineau-Desvoidy, Diptera: Calliphoridae), while Lucilia spp. (Robineau-Desvoidy, Diptera: Calliphoridae) were comparatively underrepresented in traps using liver alone. The use of a combined ox liver/manure/Na2S bait is recommended as the gold standard for generic screening of necrophagous flies. Where more specific target fly taxa are desired, such as Chrysomya spp. or Lucilia spp. only, alternate baits such as kangaroo or lamb may prove more attractive/successful.

History

Journal

Journal of Medical Entomology

Volume

56

Pagination

1283-1289

Location

England

ISSN

0022-2585

eISSN

1938-2928

Language

English

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2019, The Authors

Issue

5

Publisher

OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC

Usage metrics

    Research Publications

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC