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Distance from shore positively influences alert distance in three wetland bird species

journal contribution
posted on 2015-04-01, 00:00 authored by E J Dear, Patrick GuayPatrick Guay, R W Robinson, Mike WestonMike Weston
Behavioural responses of wetland fauna to humans constitutes a potential conservation threat, and may alter how animals use wetlands and their surrounds. We predicted that the farther from refuge (i.e. water) that terrestrially foraging rails occurred, the longer the distance at which they would become alert when approached. We found that the distance at which Eurasian Coot, Fulica atra, Purple Swamphen, Porphyrio porphyrio, and Dusky Moorhen, Gallinula tenebrosa became alert to an approaching predator (i.e. human) increased with distance from the shore of a wetland (species and starting distance were not significant but associated with low power). Thus, these behavioural measures suggest these birds use water in wetlands as a refuge from potential threats such as people. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

History

Journal

Wetlands ecology and management

Volume

23

Issue

2

Pagination

215 - 318

Publisher

Springer

Location

Berlin, Germany

ISSN

0923-4861

eISSN

1572-9834

Language

eng

Publication classification

C Journal article; C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2014, Springer