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Does migration of hybrids contribute to post-zygotic isolation in flycatchers?

journal contribution
posted on 07.03.2007, 00:00 authored by T Veen, N Svedin, J Forsman, M Hjernquist, A Qvarnström, K Thuman Hjernquist, J Träff, Marcel KlaassenMarcel Klaassen
In the face of hybridization, species integrity can only be maintained through post-zygotic isolating barriers (PIBs). PIBs need not only be intrinsic (i.e. hybrid inviability and sterility caused by developmental incompatibilities), but also can be extrinsic due to the hybrid's intermediate phenotype falling between the parental niches. For example, in migratory species, hybrid fitness might be reduced as a result of intermediate migration pathways and reaching suboptimal wintering grounds. Here, we test this idea by comparing the juvenile to adult survival probabilities as well as the wintering grounds of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) and their hybrids using stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) in feathers developed at the wintering site. Our result supports earlier observations of largely segregated wintering grounds of the two parental species. The isotope signature of hybrids clustered with that of pied flycatchers. We argue that this pattern can explain the high annual survival of hybrid flycatchers. Hence, dominant expression of the traits of one of the parental species in hybrids may substantially reduce the ecological costs of hybridization.

History

Journal

Proceedings of the Royal Society B-biological sciences

Volume

274

Issue

1610

Pagination

707 - 712

Publisher

The Royal Society

Location

London, England

ISSN

0962-8452

eISSN

1471-2954

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2006, The Royal Society