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Early-claim modifiable factors associated with return-to-work self-efficacy among workers injured at work: are there differences between psychological and musculoskeletal injuries?

journal contribution
posted on 2017-12-01, 00:00 authored by Ollie Black, M R Sim, A Collie, P Smith
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate modifiable early-injury factors which are associated with self-efficacy to return-to-work (RTW-SE) and explore whether these factors are different for people with psychological or upper-body musculoskeletal (UB-MSK) injuries. METHODS: The study used a sample of workers with a UB-MSK (N = 244) or psychological (N = 113) injury who were off work. Differences between injury types were investigated across variables related to: (1) communication with RTW stakeholders; and (2) components of the job itself. A stratified and multigroup analysis was conducted using structural equation modeling (SEM). RESULTS: Injury-stratified models revealed no significant differences. In a combined model, higher job autonomy and low-stress contact from the RTW coordinator remained significantly associated with higher RTW-SE. CONCLUSIONS: Job autonomy and low-stress contact from the RTW coordinator are possible areas to target to increase self-efficacy among injured workers.

History

Journal

Journal of occupational and environmental medicine

Volume

59

Issue

12

Pagination

e257 - e262

Publisher

Wolters Kluwer

Location

Philadelphia, Pa.

eISSN

1536-5948

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2017, the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

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