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Effect of training status and relative exercise intensity on physiological responses in men

Version 2 2024-06-03, 09:00
Version 1 2017-05-16, 15:12
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 09:00 authored by J Baldwin, Rod SnowRod Snow, MA Febbraio
PURPOSE: This study examined the effect of training status and relative exercise intensity on physiological responses to endurance exercise in humans. METHODS: Seven endurance trained (TR: peak oxygen uptake [VO2peak] = 65.8 +/- 2.4 mL x kg(-1) min(-1)) and six untrained (UT: VO2peak = 46.2 +/- 1.9 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) men cycled for 60 min, either at a work rate corresponding to approximately 70% VO2peak or approximately 95% lactate threshold (LT). RESULTS: The work rate and relative exercise intensity (i.e., % VO2peak) for UT 95% LT were lower (P < 0.01) than for all of the other trials. Although the work rate for UT 70% VO2peak was lower (P < 0.001) than for TR 70% VO2peak and TR 95% LT, average heart rate (HR) for the trial was higher (P < 0.01) throughout exercise in UT 70% VO2peak compared with all of the other trials. Plasma lactate and ammonia concentrations were greater (P < 0.01) during exercise in UT 70% VO2peak compared with all of the other trials. There was a tendency (P = 0.077) for plasma hypoxanthine to be greater at 60 min in UT 70% VO2peak compared with the other trials. At no time were any of the plasma metabolite concentrations different between the UT 95% LT, TR 95% LT and TR 70% VO2peak trials. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that HR and plasma markers of metabolic stress were greater in UT compared with TR when exercise was performed at 70% VO2peak but were similar during exercise at 95% LT.

History

Journal

Medicine & science in sports & exercise

Volume

32

Pagination

1648-1654

Location

Philadelphia, Pa.

ISSN

0195-9131

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2000, by the American College of Sports Medicine

Issue

9

Publisher

Wolters Kluwer