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Effects of Depression and Serotonergic Antidepressants on Bone: Mechanisms and Implications for the Treatment of Depression

Version 2 2024-06-03, 19:24
Version 1 2015-11-13, 11:57
journal contribution
posted on 2024-06-03, 19:24 authored by BS Fernandes, JM Hodge, Julie PascoJulie Pasco, Michael BerkMichael Berk, Lana WilliamsLana Williams
Osteoporosis is a chronic skeletal disease marked by microarchitectural deterioration of the bone matrix and depletion of bone mineral density (BMD), with a consequent increased risk for fragility fractures. It has been frequently associated with depression, which is also a chronic and debilitating disorder with high prevalence. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), first-line agents in the pharmacological treatment of mood and anxiety disorders, have also been shown to negatively affect bone metabolism. SSRIs are the most prescribed antidepressants worldwide and a large number of persons at risk of developing osteoporosis, including older patients, will receive these antidepressants. Therefore, a proper musculoskeletal evaluation of individuals who are being targeted for or using SSRIs is a priority. The aim of this article is to review the evidence regarding the effects of depression and serotonergic antidepressants on bone and its implications for clinical care.

History

Journal

Drugs and Aging

Volume

33

Pagination

21-25

Location

New Zealand

ISSN

1170-229X

eISSN

1179-1969

Language

English

Publication classification

C Journal article, C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

Copyright notice

2016, Springer

Issue

1

Publisher

ADIS INT LTD